Wedding Kimono

Wedding Kimono

  • Material: Linen damask
  • Technique: Screen printing
  • Year: 2011

The story


The kimono was sewn of old damask fabrics, previously used as tablecloth on the excursion ship Hjälmaren which sailed along the canal of the same name.
The textiles were hand-woven specifically for the luxury ship, probably in the early 19th century. I bought a basketful of them in an auction, and when I unpacked them I thought that these beautiful, thick fabricks resembled damask silks used for bridal garments in Shinto ceremonies. The idea to use cutlery as decoration occured to me when I first encountered the Japanese art of tea: I wondered what could happen if we brought our own cutlery to the table.
The WEDDING KI-MONO also reflects the roles in reltion to, and from, another person and his or her impact on our life, as well as the ultimate separation inherent to each reltionship. This is why I used cutlery connected with significant people and events in my life.
To make the decorative print and other 'embelishments of the kimono', I used original knoves and forks from the wedding gift received by my parents.

The kimono was sewn of old damask fabrics, previously used as tablecloth on the excursion ship Hjälmaren which sailed along the canal of the same name.
The textiles were hand-woven specifically for the luxury ship, probably in the early 19th century. I bought a basketful of them in an auction, and when I unpacked them I thought that these beautiful, thick fabricks resembled damask silks used for bridal garments in Shinto ceremonies. The idea to use cutlery as decoration occured to me when I first encountered the Japanese art of tea: I wondered what could happen if we brought our own cutlery to the table.
The WEDDING KI-MONO also reflects the roles in reltion to, and from, another person and his or her impact on our life, as well as the ultimate separation inherent to each reltionship. This is why I used cutlery connected with significant people and events in my life.
To make the decorative print and other 'embelishments of the kimono', I used original knoves and forks from the wedding gift received by my parents.


Joanna Bodzek

Over-interpretation

Tablecloths – cutlery – food


Aleksandra Görlich